Analytic Psychocatharsis

... combining meditation with science

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The book offers a brief overview of the different types of Yoga and then provides a comparison with the modern science of psychology. Laya Yoga, a comprehensive physical and mental method, seems to be the best pick for such research. Laya Yoga, as it was taught by the late Sant Kirpal Singh (1894-1974) in Sant Mat (Rhadasoami, Ruhani Satsang, India), is widely known as a modern method of meditation in India. There, a yogi is no longer expected to live in the forest, or to subject himself to asceticism. He is rather free to have a normal profession, have a family and children, and is expected to include modern scientific aspects into his teachings. Kirpal Singh's Surat Shabd Yoga (his name for Laya Yoga) is also related to Patanjali's yoga. 'Yoga is chit vritis nirodha', is being in command of 'chit' (the conscious) and 'vritis' (vibrations, transformations), which Kirpal Singh set forth as being equivalent with his 'light' and 'sound' principle in meditation.

We come across such terms and principles in Psychoanalysis, the most significant form of scientific psychology found in the western world today. Especially in French psychoanalyst J. Lacan's version of Freud's drive-structure concept do we find perception drives (drive to perceive, to look) and invocation drives (drive to express, to speak) that function in the unconscious, and which are predominant. Actually, the drive to look is nothing other than 'chit', a kind of primary conscious, an immediate gaze, or better and simply put: an IT SHINES. IT SHINES means that something primarily visual, a primary visual awareness, or primary visibility is constantly at work within and around us. It is at work when images are being produced in dreams as well as in 'light' experiences in meditation, and last but not the least, this is also the most subtle of physical reality.

After all, the conscious is nothing other than a 'reciprocated gaze', a reflection, or a 'primal form' of looking or of perception. In the same way we can substitute 'vritis' with the drive to speak, which is the most substantial form of invocation: the IT SPEAKS. Lacan says: "The unconscious is structured in the same manner a language is...", it behaves like an IT SPEAKS within and around us. A combination of the SHINES and of the SPEAKS actually requires to be taken under command and setting yoga and psychoanalysis into relation with one another supplies us with a simple tool to do just that.

In Surat Shabd Yoga command is taken of the combination of the SHINES and SPEAKS by applying and reverberating mentaly Sanskrit formulations. But for a scientifc method we can use linguistic styled formulations which I call FORMULA-WORDS.

Collapse of the Other's Attention

Kirpal Singh's request to his 'master' to be allowed continuance in enjoying his company and guidance through the 'vision' and voice of his master while carrying on with the 'assignment' concerning Sawan Singh's work was denied.1 Sawan Singh crisply refused the request.

Weiterlesen: Collapse of the Other's Attention

Kirpal Singh and Succession

I have been a devotee of Kirpal Singh for over thirty years now, and have simultaneously practiced general medicine and psychoanalysis for almost the same period of time. Based thereupon, I feel a distinct urge of taking on the challenge of scientifically estimating and critique the life and teachings of Kirpal Singh and yoga generally, though I may fall short of the mark because of the significance of his personality.

Weiterlesen: Kirpal Singh and Succession

Primal Repression in the Gaze-Image

Why speak of the 'sun, moon and stars'? In Surat Shabd yoga the individual is often in a kind of self-analysis which bears danger of him overlooking his own resistance to analysis.1 This calls for a strict guideline, namely to concentrate on simple symbols, such the sun, moon and stars.

Weiterlesen: Primal Repression in the Gaze-Image

Father Figure and Rich Woman

Lets make a mixture from all of that and find a new declaration! Freud centred his psychoanalytic theory on the figure of the dead father. When Oedipus kills his father, or devotees disdain their religion founders, a father-personality dies and people are left with the resulting. Subsequently, the father-figure is elevated to a god.

Weiterlesen: Father Figure and Rich Woman

Introduction to ARE - VID - EOR

ARE – VID – EOR

is such a name. It does not originate in Sanskrit. As Kirpal Singh always said: „Sanskrit is not the lingua franca of spirituality”, stressing that the meaning of his Sanskrit names did not lie in Old Indian language, but in others, too.

Weiterlesen: Introduction to ARE - VID - EOR

Verbal Expressions - Yoga and Psychoanalysis

This dialogic seductive assumption, which he offers us while listening until he can give an acceptable interpretation – isn’t it located at the same level at which the Sat guru promises to let us see God, were we only to follow a few rules he set up?

Weiterlesen: Verbal Expressions - Yoga and Psychoanalysis

Transference requires Dissolution

Demands to love or to merge, idealizations need to be interpreted as infantile aspirations, as pre-mature sexual desires, so that the one being analyzed becomes independent, clarifies his desire and speaks his word in life himself. The act of dissolution releases the follower into the role of the teacher.

Weiterlesen: Transference requires Dissolution

Double-Take Gaze

There must have been a phase of multiple perception during the transition from animal to human being, "a deviation of the identical"1, or simultaneous multi-layer picture perception. It could lead to a 'super perception' and finally, to an so called omni- or synchronal perception.

Weiterlesen: Double-Take Gaze

On Incarnation

Just as an Oedipus complex in its pathologic form in psychoanalysis calls for dissipation1, it is in the same way the goal of all meditation to finally terminate reincarnations.

Weiterlesen: On Incarnation

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